Friday, March 11, 2016

Kinky sex is more common among the general population : New Survey




A new research published in recently published in The Journal of Sex from Institut Philippe-Pinel de Montreal and the Institut universitaire en sante mentale de Montreal , affiliated to the Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres reveals what we think is abnormal sexual behaviour or impulse characterised by intense sexual fantasies and urges that keep coming back is actually fairly common among people, including women. Based on the phone and online survey of 1,040 residents of Quebec the main goal of the study was to determine normal sexual desires and experiences in a representative sample of the general population. The findings showed a number of legal sexual interests and behaviours considered anomalous in psychiatry are actually common in the general population. Whilst men are more interested in paraphilic behaviours than women. Seems according to this research, women share the same interests. Women who reported an interest in sexual submission had more varied sexual interests and reported greater satisfaction with their sex lives. The data revealed less than half (45.6 percent) of the sample subjects were interested in at least one type of sexual behaviour that is considered anomalous, and one third (33 percent) had experienced the behaviour at least once.



Out of the eight types of paraphilic behaviour listed in the DSM-5, four (voyeurism - 35%, fetishism - 26%, frotteurism - 26% and masochism - 19%) are neither rare nor unusual when it comes to the experiences or desires reported by men and women. The researchers also found a statistically significant relationship between an interest in sexual submission and an interest in other sexual activities, suggesting that the desire to engage in masochism is significantly associated with more diverse sexual interests.

Reference
Christian C. Joyal et al. The Prevalence of Paraphilic Interests and Behaviors in the General Population: A Provincial Survey, The Journal of Sex Research (2016).

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